Friday’s Finds #4

This week marked six years as a free-agent. I announced it on Twitter and received many kind words – thank you. Once again, my weekly sense-making from the Twitter files:

@ellenfweber “Since brains integrate knowledge naturally, while humans falsely separate facts artificially, integration is central to great learning.”

via @1ernesto150 Ways to Use Twitter in the College Classroom

all our HR and org design theory is based on nothing but dogma“; which is why we badly need new organizational & management models

RT @zecoolNB Community College Fredericton relocates to the University of New Brunswick; expect more physical mergers in higher education as costs increase

via @charlesjennings – “When it’s just so obvious NOT to train it’s painful to watch it happen

via @Pistachio How to be Happy in Business (Venn diagram) – Reminded me of another Venn diagram (your purpose) by @DavePollard

College/university education at the undergraduate level is now merely credential farming

10 simple things (SlideShare) we can do to change our food system

via @gbrettmiller Theoria cum Praxi » Cynefin, concept work, and the role of deliberate practice

In chaos we are forced to develop novel practices, therefore we need chaos for innovation; then from  @nickcharney My favourite Nietzsche quote: “One must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a dancing star”.

4 Responses to “Friday’s Finds #4”

  1. RobbieRobSki

    Just what I need to keep up: a weekly summary of worthwhile twits with Harold’s insight… Keep up the writing discipline, Harold, while others (thinking of myself) have their heads spinning!!

    Reply
  2. Jon Husband

    “all our HR and org design theory is based on nothing but dogma“; which is why we badly need new organizational & management models

    Heh …

    I don’t think that this can be true. If it were, then all the objectives, in organizations around the world, would include a component addressing a quest for effective innovation in HR and management.

    Anyone ever wonder why there are so very few consultants “accepted” by organizations when they dare to challenge dogma and / orthodoxy, and when they urge trying / working in a disciplined way at truly new concepts and dynamics ? I do. I think very few organizational leaders really want to entertain or engender deep, profound change.

    Reply
  3. Brett

    Harold, thanks for the mention. It is all still an idea swimming around in my head. More feedback and discussion can only help me get a better idea of what exactly I mean.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>