Seeking feedback on PKM

We are just finishing the second PKM in 40 Days online workshop this year. So far we have have had over 75 participants in the new format of 40 days online, 6 themes, 18 activities, and 14 days for reflection and catch-up. Each workshop is different but it is always great to get serious feedback on what PKM means for those who have undertaken the workshop.

I am realising the benefits of practicing what the PKM concept preaches…

1. SEEKING is a good start, but it isn’t enough.

2. SENSING INCLUDES PRIORITISING
We must make SENSE of everything we find, and that includes prioritising–recognising what is useful now, what will be useful later, and what may not be useful. The trick is to learn how to store the ‘useful later’ stuff so that I can get back to it, and this has been a key ‘take away’ for me. I’ve particularly enjoyed learning about this … Learning about how to organise information was a key reason I signed up for this program, so I’m a happy customer.

3. And finally, I have become more mindful that we must SHARE insights we’ve formed so that we can give back to the ‘universe’, as much as we get. What stood out for me was the fact that just ‘forwarding’ isn’t always helpful sharing. This is my reason for this post. I’m definitely thinking out loud here, so forgive me, but I’m trying to articulate the key insights I’ve taken away, hoping that it will help you frame this program with future participants.

Therefore, if I were to comment on this program, Harold, I’d have to say it’s brilliant: it offers something for all of us. But it’s up to each of us to take what you offer; make SENSE of it and filter it to identify information that is immediately useful vs useful later vs less useful, then SHARE key insights formed as a result of having gone through this process. – Chemene Sinson

The next workshop begins on Monday, 4 August, with promotional pricing of $149 until 13 July.

In the meantime, I have been asked by a major publisher to submit a book proposal. I have a few questions, especially for regular readers and any graduates of our workshops, that the publisher is asking me.

  1. What would be a good book title/sub-title?
  2. Does the term “personal knowledge mastery” make sense to a general audience?
  3. Is a book on PKM needed now, and if so why?
  4. Am I the most suitable person to write this book?
  5. If I wrote this book, would you buy it?
  6. Should I write a book on a different subject, other than PKM? (for example, my ebook covers several topics)

Help on any of these questions would be appreciated!

PKM seek sense share

4 Responses to “Seeking feedback on PKM”

  1. Russell Kerkhoven

    Hi Harold, feedback on your questions
    1. re title: If you want more than PKM explained; let this one stew for a while or start a competition for a free book
    re sub-title: Mastering Personal Knowledge Management
    2. “personal knowledge mastery” see suggested subtitle and the PK mastery is too ambiguous.
    3. Book on PKM needed: yes for your own profile & reflection; for your alumni as a reference, I still use a print out from my first PKM course; writing the book will also enable/challenge you to explore a few themes deeper/richer an have some fun along the way! Rationale: PKM through Seek, Sense, Share is increasingly proving itself in learning behaviour on the internet;
    4. Are you the most suitable person to write this book? No, so what….just do it!
    5. If I wrote this book, would you buy it? even more so if there is a challenge and some crowd co-writing involved ;-); I would be even more interested if the book was my key to some network/community of people applying this stuff in their work (an inspirational example (very different content) is Markus Buckingham and the Strengthfinder. So having a test in there that gives me feedback on my own PKM behaviour will seduce me to buy….
    5. Do the PKM book and approach it from different angles; I would be interested to see how PKM fits in with: …Small and Medium enterprises (still the backbone of economic life in many places); family businesses; and open innovation in the social or public domain; your future of work statements at time tend to be geared to large international corporations, while it is unclear if that is the only future of work and economy.

    Reply
  2. Brent MacKinnon

    What would be a good book title/sub-title?
    1. Does the term “personal knowledge mastery” make sense to a general audience?
    I don’t think the term makes sense to a general audience, however I believe it is the right term to use, regardless. The PKM framework invites people to restore (invigorate) responsibility for their personal and professional development. Also, the PKM framework gives a pathway to undo decades of unhealthy systemic mindsets (messages) in the school and work systems. The diagrams used (seek, sense, share) quickly conveys the framework and can get the general audience to start grasping what PKM is about.
    2. Is a book on PKM needed now, and if so why?
    It is needed now. The working and learning ground is fertile and ready for planting. Selfishly, having your book now will help me immensely as I will use it to help explain and refer PKM to those that I’m working with and growing with.
    3. Am I the most suitable person to write this book?
    Uniquivately – YES – You will keep it beta centric and keep pushing on the outer edges of learning and working…there is so much to be done…
    4. If I wrote this book, would you buy it?
    Yes
    5. Should I write a book on a different subject, other than PKM? (for example, my ebook covers several topics)
    My preference is PKM as your subject. From my perspective, PKM is that lighthouse on your homepage.

    I look forward to hearing your decision Harold and good on you for seeking this feedback.

    Reply
  3. Jonathan Anthony (@ThisMuchWeKnow)

    Harold – as you know, I am a huge fan, so I encourage you to go further. I was just reading Seth Godin’s blog post for today wherein he synthesizes 30 years of projects with some simple explanations.
    http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2014/07/thirty-years-of-projects.html
    Read it and consider: “What’s the most I can do?”

    What would be a good book title/sub-title?
    “mastery” is a word du jour, especially since Pink has been banging on about it, so there is an element of power to it that I like.
    sub-titles tend to be self-helpy so buyers can put themselves in the front seat – “this book is about me!”
    eg How to become a better colleague, lead from behind, kickstart fantastic projects and get ready for the future of work…

    Does the term “personal knowledge mastery” make sense to a general audience?
    Think of Godin and the great marketeers, there is a certain sizzle to their work that opens the content to a greater audience. “PKM” sounds very earnest. Think about what Brian Solis did with his WTF book with gapingvoid cartoons. He essentially took some quite deep, dense, dry content and sexed it up. My guess is that is not your style, but when you are dealing with dark times and shifting sands, some lightness of touch goes a long way (unless you are a polemicist).

    Is a book on PKM needed now, and if so why?
    yes, because of all the macro elements you write about in the way work is getting done. Your work is about self-ownership.

    Am I the most suitable person to write this book?
    Undoubtedly, and how to include / squeeze your network is an interesting idea…

    If I wrote this book, would you buy it?
    yes

    Should I write a book on a different subject, other than PKM? (for example, my ebook covers several topics)
    Well, you probably have several books in you.
    Where is your energy and motivation? What topic most juices you every day?

    Reply

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