integrating personal knowledge mastery

I developed the personal knowledge mastery (PKM) framework for myself, beginning in 2004, as a way to make sense of all the digital information flows around me and to connect with others to improve my practice. In 2012 I was contacted by Domino’s Pizza to help incorporate the PKM framework into their leadership training (PDF). Last year Jane Hart and I worked with The Carlsberg Group to add PKM into their Learning Leaders Program.

PKM is applicable to any organization though it takes some effort to develop it for a specific context. An excellent example of this is posted as four articles by the Listening & Spoken Language organization, Hearing First, whom I first met in 2013. Below are some highlights from these posts showing an integrated approach to using PKM for continuous learning.

To learn more, my PKM open workshops are conducted four times per year. If your organization would like to improve workplace learning and knowledge-sharing, then contact me about a private engagement for co-creation as a service.

1. Seek > Sense > Share

In our original blog post on connected learning, we shared three facets of learning: professional homes, learning communities and personal learning networks. The actions of Seek-Sense-Share can occur in each of them.

While this model can sound very linear, the process of Seek-Sense-Share doesn’t have to happen in a structured form. As we move through different tasks and roles in our day, we begin to collect learnings, make sense of what we’ve discovered and share it with others as we go. It is through this sharing process that collective minds can solve more problems, improve our practice and make greater gains in LSL outcomes for children with hearing loss.

2. Personal Knowledge Mastery

Managing the steady stream of new content online requires a systematic approach. It’s tempting to haphazardly use our inboxes to hold onto things to read “when there’s time.” To avoid a backlog of blogs to read later, it’s better to create a plan to harness the information flow and actually learn something. For example, instead of retweeting something to track what we like, we’re retweeting it as the first step in a master plan for organizing and applying all that information to our daily practice. If managed well, all that information can be empowering rather than overpowering.

3. PKM For Families

KEY TAKEAWAYS

We hope it’s been helpful to see a few different ways you can manage and utilize your personal knowledge networks as an LSL family. Here are a few tips for making it even easier:

Out running errands or traveling? Listen to podcasts in your car for more opportunities to learn on the go.
Social bookmarking tools and customized news feeds from online sources can help you organize, manage and keep track of massive amounts of material.
Information you gather from online sources can be shared with other parents at play dates, get togethers, support groups or on personal blogs.
In addition to connecting with information, you can find and connect with online mentors for support, networking and coaching.

4. PKM For Professionals

KEY TAKEAWAYS

We hope it’s been helpful to see a few different ways that LSL professionals and parents can manage and master their personal knowledge networks. Whether you are a LSL professional or the parent of a child with hearing loss…

Twitter is a tool you can use to connect with others who share similar interests in listening, spoken language, literacy and early childhood education.
If you find yourself spending a lot of time in the car each day, listening to podcasts can provide opportunities to learn “on the go.”
Social bookmarking tools and customized news feeds from online sources can help you organize, manage and keep track of massive amounts of material.
Information you gather from online sources can be shared through in-person discussions with work peers, parents, at staff meetings and support groups or via online mediums including social media and personal blogs.
In addition to connecting with information, both parents and professionals can connect with mentors online for support, networking and coaching.

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