reading and understanding

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds.

“In my whole life, I have known no wise people who didn’t read all the time — none, zero.” —Charles Munger via @JimHays

@raesmaa “Don’t read everything you believe.”

“In our obscurity—in all this vastness—there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us.” —Carl Sagan via @themadstone

“We shall soon be in a world in which a man may be howled down for saying that two and two make four, in which people will persecute the heresy of calling a triangle a three-sided figure, and hang a man for maddening a mob with the news that grass is green.”G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

@EskoKilpi “The most underutilized resource still waiting for discovery may be our ability to cooperate.”

Songs of … Experience? by @bonstewart

“On the plane yesterday I read a blog post by Keith Hamon in which he explores the #MeToo hashtag as hyper-object and experiential … that there is no unity or single artifact to emerge from the hashtag, but rather the noise is the point. I also read an article in which major alt-right Twitter personas were just outed as Russian trolls. So much of what has shaped public narrative in the last 16-18 months is still something we don’t fully have literacies to process, because tactical uses of Twitter make possible the unleashing of any narrative into an experiential environment that can convert biases and prejudices and positionality into perceived reality, into things people can’t unsee or unknow.

The combination of the two pieces got me thinking that being literate in a hashtag world involves recognizing that media are now experiential, full stop.”

Suppressing TVO video, stifling free speech, is making Wilfrid Laurier unsafe

“Many have kids at Laurier [University] or they are about to send them. They’re worried. One thing I tell them is that the cultural climate of Laurier is actually pretty similar to most Canadian universities. No institution has risen to become a beacon of free expression.

2 Responses to “reading and understanding”

  1. Dave deBronkart

    > tactical uses of Twitter make possible the unleashing of any narrative
    > into an experiential environment that can convert
    > biases and prejudices and positionality into perceived reality

    I’m wondering about the meaning of “experiential” here. (I know you didn’t say it; still, I’m wondering how you take it.)

    Dictionaries don’t seem too useful, but the Wikipedia article is informative https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Experiential_knowledge … e.g. ‘as D. T. Suzuki put it, “fire. Mere talking of it will not make the mouth burn”.’

    Could the @bonstewart quote be saying “Don’t make me think – I know what I felt, and you can’t make me ‘un-felt’ it”?

    Reply
  2. Harold Jarche

    My understanding is that Bonnie sees this as an effect of the medium. It makes us feel without thinking, and even after thinking about it we cannot un-feel our initial reactions.

    Reply

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