Posts By: Harold Jarche

cities and the future of work

Note: This post is based on several earlier ones. These have been edited and synthesized to a single composition in advance of my sessions in Helsinki on 3 November 2017 with The National Foresight Network and the Prime Minister’s Office where we will discuss the transformation of work and its consequences. This post looks at the… Read more »

distributing power for the network era

A certain amount of command and control, exercised through a hierarchy is often necessary to get work done. I suggest temporary, negotiated hierarchies so that teams can form and re-form depending on what needs to be done. Reorganization can be inherent in the enterprise structure and not a cataclysmic event that happens only when management… Read more »

the future of work is perpetual beta

Automation is a force that is continuously changing the nature of human work. First it replaced brute force with powerful machines, changing the nature of agriculture, mining, construction, and other fields of human activity. Then automated programs replaced simple work like withdrawing money from a bank account. Now automation is replacing complicated work, like coordinating… Read more »

radical ideas

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. @holden: “So a radical idea — maybe instead of teaching learners to code we should teach coders to learn: sociology, history, policy.” “No one is going to give you the education you need to… Read more »

creating resilient knowledge networks

The personal knowledge mastery framework is a combination of seeking knowledge, making sense of it, and sharing it with others. It can become a long-term discipline of individually constructed enabling processes to help each of us make sense of our world, work more effectively, and contribute to society. Two key variables are how we make sense of knowledge… Read more »

adapting to life in perpetual beta

Twenty years ago I was finishing my Master’s thesis on learning in the information technology workplace. A significant part of my research relied on the work of Marshall McLuhan, especially his laws of media. My job at the time was the development of all training related to a fleet of helicopters employed in tactical aviation:… Read more »

thinking about facebook

This is a follow up on my post about the convenience of platforms like Facebook, which dominates online social networking. That one company has such global influence should be of concern to all of us. Our social networks define us, as Christakis & Fowler clearly showed in their 2011 book, Connected. “Most of us are… Read more »

intellectual craftsmanship

I was recently referred to a most interesting article, Intellectual Craftsmanship, via Nicole Martin who had recently completed my PKM Workshop. It is a part of C. Wright Mills’ larger work, The Sociological Imagination (1959). “Hailed upon publication as a cogent and hard-hitting critique, The Sociological Imagination took issue with the ascendant schools of sociology in… Read more »

friday inventions

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “There are two different types of people in the world: Those who want to know, and those who want to believe.” —Friedrich Nietzsche, via @othertwice @njbowden: “Imagine if cities put as much thought, effort,… Read more »

The Copenhagen Letter

I signed The Copenhagen Letter. Perhaps you should too, if you think that all people should control the technology that runs the world, not just the surveillance capitalists. Well, at least read it, please. To everyone who shapes technology today. We live in a world where technology is consuming society, ethics, and our core existence. It… Read more »