Posts By: Harold Jarche

our collective learnscape

In 2009 the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that journalism is no longer the sole domain of professionals [my highlights]. [96] A second preliminary question is what the new defence should be called.  In arguments before us, the defence was referred to as the responsible journalism test.  This has the value of capturing the essence… Read more »

a convenience truth

Probably one the greatest barriers to positive change is convenience. For example, we know that automobiles contribute significantly to pollution, obesity, and greenhouse gases. However, most of us own at least one car and many of us own more than one. Why? Cars are extremely convenient. Having lived car-free in a rural North American town… Read more »

preparing for perpetual beta

The latest technology gadget or silicon valley ‘disruptive’ business model is merely incremental change. But I am convinced that we are living in the middle of an epochal change. I use David Ronfeldt’s TIMN model (2009)  to explain that we are shifting from a tri-form society, where markets dominate, to a quadriform society, where networks… Read more »

top tools 2017

Jane Hart compiles a list every year of the Top 100 Tools for learning. This is the 11th year! Voting closes on 22 September 2017. Here are my top tools this year, with the past five years shown below. It’s interesting to note that my preferred tools have not changed that much over the years…. Read more »

“people are for caring”

Christian Madsbjerg concludes in his book, Sensemaking: “What are people for? Algorithms can do many things, but they will never actually give a damn. People are for caring.” How can we understand the complexity of human networks, especially when they are massaged by algorithms that drive our social media? Empathy can put us in other… Read more »

hunters in the jungle

The challenge for workers in what is becoming a freelance & gig economy is to survive in the global jungle. Work is moving toward temporary, negotiated hierarchies. The challenge for the modern organization is to have a flexible enough structure to let people move in and out of the jungle. Workers can also find short-term… Read more »

thinking critically

Every fortnight or so, I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “Experience plus reflection is the learning that lasts.” —Charles Handy, via @olliegardener On internet privacy, be very afraid [including the canvas fingerprinting on this link] via @courosa “Unfortunately, we live in a… Read more »

Sensemaking and the power of the humanities

What is Sensemaking? Christian Madsbjerg, in Sensemaking: The Power of the Humanities in the Age of the Algorithm, describes sensemaking as an interaction with fellow humans in the real world. “Sensemaking is practical wisdom grounded in the humanities. We can think of sense making as as the exact opposite of algorithmic thinking: it is entirely… Read more »

friday’s urban finds

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “Cars are like pharmaceuticals. There’s a legitimate place for them, but we resort to them too much.” —Peter D. Norton, via @grescoe “And then you automate it, and it makes that same mistake hundreds… Read more »

blogging break

No, I have not stopped blogging, though my lack of recent posts may have given that impression. I have decided to take a bit of a Summer break, continue my reading and observations on social media, and take time for cycling. I recently completed a 4-day trip to Cape Breton, enjoying the slow pace of… Read more »