Posts By: Harold Jarche

architects of our future

Stanford Prison Experiment It has been generally thought in the popular press that the Stanford Prison Experiment showed that normal people act like sadistic guards when placed in a ‘prison-like’ environment. In this interview with Guy Kawasaki, Dr. Philip Zimbardo discusses his 1971 prison experiment, where students played their roles as guards or prisoners and abuses started within… Read more »

the square and the tower

In The Square and The Tower, Niall Ferguson presents us a detailed series of examinations of the struggle between networks and hierarchies in managing society since the advent of writing. A central theme of the book is “that the tension between distributed networks and hierarchical orders is as old as humanity itself.” For example, he… Read more »

coffee, communities, and condescension

Last month I started a coffee club so that subscribers to this blog could purchase the equivalent of a cup of coffee for me each month. This week we had our first online video conference with five participants. As a result we decided that this would be a good place to have deeper and more… Read more »

a vision for learning

Harvard Business Review described The Fifth Discipline by Peter Senge, as one of the seminal management books of the previous 75 years. The five disciplines necessary for a learning organisation are: Personal Mastery Mental Models Shared Vision Team Learning Systems Thinking (which integrates the other four) In the January 2017 issue of Inside Learning Technologies,… Read more »

some thoughts on thinking

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” —Ray Bradbury, via @holdengraber @_Amanda_Killan: “Libraries literally aren’t just a place to obtain books for free. They’re… Read more »

collaborating with the enemy

Collaborating with the Enemy by Adam Kahane gives a framework of how to work with people you don’t agree with, like, or trust. Kahane developed it through his years of conducting collaboration workshops such as the Mont Fleur sessions to prepare for a post-apartheid South Africa. I read his first book in 2005, Solving Tough… Read more »

the coffee club

Last October I suggested that subscribers to this blog could buy me a monthly cup of coffee to support my writing. Several of you have done so: thank you! We now have a private online space to continue our conversations. To kick off 2018 I have decided to make the beta conversations available exclusively to coffee club… Read more »

embracing automation

Automation Automation, the replacement of human work with human-made technology, has been happening ever since we invented tools. Just as farmhands were replaced by machines 100 years ago, so too will knowledge workers be replaced by networked computers in the next few decades. Last century, those farmhands had the option of moving to the city… Read more »

friday’s finds 2017

Every second Friday I review what I’ve noted on social media and post a wrap-up of what caught my eye. I do this as a reflective thinking process and to put what I’ve learned on a platform I control: this blog. Here are what I consider the best of Friday’s Finds for 2017. Quotes “Democracy… Read more »

constantly learning nodes

Here are some thoughts about learning that I developed on this blog the past year. We lack good models for organizing in a networked society. Many people are turning back to older, and outdated organizational models like nationalism and tribalism in an attempt to gain some stability. But most of our institutions and markets will… Read more »