Posts Categorized: Learning

the third bucket

In a discussion I had with a senior Human Resources executive at a large corporation, he noted that when it comes to managing people and their talents, there are three buckets. Two of these are easy to fill, while the third is the real challenge: 1. Tools 2. Skills 3. Meta-Competencies: Learning how to Learn… Read more »

a workable future

In the IFTF report Ten Strategies for a Workable Future, the authors highlight issues for the US labour force, which I believe are applicable to many other countries and economies. (full report PDF) Combine the best of investor-owned and commons-based platform models Solve for both transparency and privacy Integrate marginalized workers in a sustainable economy… Read more »

workplace of the future

Clark Quinn, in collaboration with Learnnovators, has created a free and open course on the workplace of the future. The course is dedicated to our late colleague, Jay Cross, founder of the Internet Time Alliance. Each of us provided input and references for the course.

top tools 2016

Jane Hart compiles a list every year of the Top 100 Tools for learning. This is the 10th year! Well done, Jane 🙂 Voting closes on 23 September 2016. Here are my top tools this year, with the past five years shown below. It’s interesting to note that my preferred tools have not changed much…. Read more »

imagining open collaboration

At work and in school we are pretty good at creating documentation to share explicit knowledge. This is the kind of knowledge that goes into training programmes. It’s the result of interviews with subject matter experts and reviews of the field of study. For the most part, it’s stuff that is easy to codify and… Read more »

we are the experts

If work is learning, and learning is the work, why do we need experts responsible for managing it? Do we need learning experts in the network era? Hierarchies and experts have a symbiotic relationship. Without hierarchies, no authority can tell us who is the expert. Were people able to learn before there were hierarchies and… Read more »

connected curiosity

Some people seem to be naturally curious. Others work at it, while some just lack interest in learning. You can notice this when traveling. Some people can describe many aspects of their local vicinity while others don’t know anything about why certain features exist. They say that the most interesting people are those who are… Read more »

tensions of modern learning

Clark Quinn, my Internet Time Alliance colleague, has presented a quick view of old and new ways to address organizational learning engineering. Clark created a table “representing just some of the tensions” between what we still do and what we now know about learning. I have appended these new practices with examples and elaborations of… Read more »

real learning is not abstract

Are we entering an era that heralds ‘The End of Reflection’, as this NY Times article suggests? “Mr. [Nicholas] Carr observed that, for decades, Rodin’s 1902 sculpture “The Thinker” epitomized the highest form of contemplation: a figure with an imposing physique staring abstractly downward, hunched over to block out distraction, frozen because it’s a statue,… Read more »

“modelling is the best way to teach”

When we teach through modelling behaviour, the learner is in control, whereas teaching by shaping behaviour means the teacher is in control. In Western society, shaping has been the dominant mode for a very long time. But in other societies, it has not been the norm. For instance, Dr. Clare Brant was the first Aboriginal… Read more »