Posts Categorized: Performance Improvement

the bridge from education to experience

“Apprenticeship is the way we learn most naturally. It characterized learning before there were schools, from learning one’s language to learning how to run an empire.” – Cognitive Apprenticeship: Making Thinking Visible In the apprenticeship model, novices learn under the tutelage of a master, but for the most part are assisted by journeymen, who are… Read more »

moving to social learning

“We are living in a world where access trumps knowledge every time. Those who know how to search, find and make the connections will succeed. Those who rely on static knowledge and skills alone will fail.” —Charles Jennings We are all interconnected because technology has enabled communication networks on a worldwide scale, so that systemic… Read more »

enough training

In a recent CBC News story, a railway conductor lost her job following a derailment. She claimed she was not adequately trained. Here is a comment from the Railway Association representative: “In your job, you are qualified and do your job, but you feel you should know more. It doesn’t mean you are not qualified… Read more »

Preparing your workforce for tomorrow

I created a performance improvement toolbox when I started this blog in 2004, and have kept adding to it over the years. I often look at workplace performance first from the perspective of whether the situation we are trying to address is complicated or complex. Training works well for complicated problems, when you have clear… Read more »

Seeing What Others Don’t – Review

Following Gary Klein on his search to find out how insight happens is a pleasurable, even mind-blowing experience. In Seeing What Others Don’t, Klein begins with an open mind and decides that he needs to stay out of the laboratory of puzzle-solving, described in the chapter on how not to search for insights. His perspective… Read more »

Experience, Exposure, Education

70%: Experience 20%: Exposure 10%: Education The 70:20:10 Framework Explained is a holistic framework, a “reference model”, and not a recipe. “A reference model is an abstract framework consisting of an interlinking set of clearly defined concepts produced by an expert or body of experts in order to encourage clear communication.” – p.17. Charles Jennings explains… Read more »

The risky quadrant

Donald Taylor asks where your learning & development (training) department resides. Are you unacknowledged prophets, with a manager or executive who understands that you need to change, but the organization lags behind? Are you facing comfortable extinction, like the once dominant but now bankrupt Kodak? Or are you in the training ghetto, disconnected from the… Read more »

The right tool for the right job

In my presentation, From Training, to Performance, to Social, I describe how Human Performance Technology (HPT) is systemic and systematic, but not very human. However, HPT, especially performance analysis can be a useful tool, if used selectively and appropriately. It does not work well for tasks that require high degrees of tacit knowledge and cooperation… Read more »

Scaffolding and capability building

Jane Hart’s recent post on changing the role of L&D (learning & development) explains how training departments need to move beyond packaging content and toward scaffolding and capability building. What I like about this matrix is that it makes it easier to describe my professional services in the organizational learning area. I have highlighted my… Read more »