Posts Categorized: Work

ask the difficult questions

“Weak human + machine + better process was superior to a strong computer alone and, more remarkably, superior to a strong human + machine + inferior process.” —Garry Kasparov The future of work will be humans augmented by machines, and those with the best processes will succeed. In How to Become a Centaur, Nicky Case… Read more »

network management protocols

My principle of network management is an update of the principle of scientific management put forth by F.W. Taylor in 1911. “It is only through enforced standardization of methods, enforced adoption of the best implements and working conditions, and enforced cooperation that this faster work can be assured. And the duty of enforcing the adoption of standards and enforcing this cooperation… Read more »

fifteen years

Today marks fifteen years of self-employment. After two years I had noted that my business was good enough for some cheeses but still too young for most wines. Today I’m a very old chunk of cheese but a much better wine, I hope. By the four-year mark I had experienced clients not paying me and… Read more »

autonomous workers in learning organizations

The Learning Organization The Fifth Discipline by Peter Senge, is one of the seminal management books of the previous 75 years. It is based on four interrelated disciplines unified by the fifth discipline: systems thinking. Personal Mastery Mastery comes through deliberate practice. Personal knowledge mastery is the ability to see patterns hidden to the undisciplined… Read more »

human capital

“No, people are NOT capital. YOUR ‘human capital’ is what you’ve learned and not forgotten. It’s ‘capital’ each person ‘owns’ themselves; FAR more equally distributed than financial capital. Our economy needs institutions to make learning and earning better for those with less money.” —Byron Auguste In firms that are ‘human capital-intensive’, “Should employees be shareholders?”… Read more »

agile sensemaking

“Complex environments represent a continuous challenge for sensemaking in organizations. Continuous ambiguity exerts continuous pressures on organizations to modify their patterns of interaction, information flow and decision making. Organizations struggle to address situations that are precarious, explanations that are equivocal and paradoxical, and cognitive dilemmas of all kinds. This creates a demand for innovative approaches… Read more »

connected coaching

“Teaching and coaching are fundamentally about helping making other people better. Learning to do this can’t be done via shortcuts. It requires a willingness to be patient, to take your time and have a deep desire to develop your craft.” —@IamSporticus My work over the past several decades has confirmed that the best leaders are… Read more »

self-determination ensures democracy

Self-determination theory (SDT) is based on three innate human requirements: Competence, Relatedness, and Autonomy. Deci and Ryan [the researchers] claim that there are three essential elements of the theory: 1. Humans are inherently proactive with their potential and mastering their inner forces (such as drives and emotions) 2. Humans have an inherent tendency toward growth… Read more »

business schools are a technology of the last century

Our dominant models of how we organize and work as a society are fundamentally changing as we transition from an Information-Market economy to a Creative-Network economy. Charles Green succinctly explained the order in which this transition happens: “Ideas lead technology. Technology leads organizations. Organizations lead institutions. Then ideology brings up the rear, lagging all the… Read more »

automation + capitalism = a perfect storm

I have often discussed the automation of work here and how we need to focus our development and education efforts on human competencies that cannot be done by software or machines. But is automation really the major cause of workplace disruption? For example, in Sweden automation is welcomed by workers who have state support systems for… Read more »