walking to extinction

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds.

“The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.” – Henry David Thoreau – via @dennisdenktmee

@hvaelama“get all of humanity to educate itself swiftly enough to generate spontaneous social behaviors that will avoid extinction.”

@monkchips“holacracy is Greek for bullshit, right?” (more…)

best finds of 2015

Every second Friday I review what I’ve noted on social media and post a wrap-up of what caught my eye. I do this as a reflective thinking process and to put what I’ve learned on a platform I control: this blog. Here are what I consider the best of Friday’s Finds for 2015.

Quotes

All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” – Friedrich Nietzsche – via @surreallyno

@ericgarland – “Humility is often painful, but arrogance is always fatal.

@willrich45 – Engagement: “Not a metric for learning. A prerequisite.

“I think it’s a discovery all artists make: the most interesting and bravest work is likely the hardest to make a living from.”@berkun

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it”  — Upton Sinclair – via @jerrymichalski (more…)

learning in the network era

This week I am reviewing my posts from 2015 and putting some of the core ideas together. Here are some thoughts on personal and social learning in the network era.

Training, and education, are often solutions looking for a problem. But good training and education can have a huge impact on behaviour and performance. Remember that great teacher who inspired you? Did you ever have a coach who got you to a higher level of performance? But throwing content at someone and hoping for learning to happen is not a good strategy. This is how far too many courses are designed and delivered.

More: 9-ways-to-improve-workplace-learning

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platform capitalism and the post-job economy

This week I am reviewing my posts from 2015 and putting some of the core ideas together. Here are some thoughts on the changing nature of work and shifting wealth creation.

Platform capitalism is beginning to define the economy for the second Gilded Age we seem to be entering. It requires 4 contributing factors, which when combined, create a perfect opportunity for the ‘uberization’ of almost any industry.

  • A platform: a mobile application delivered through an oligopoly like iTunes or Google Play.
  • A critical mass of users: upwardly mobile knowledge workers, especially those in Silicon Valley or the tech sector.
  • Desperate service providers: people with no ability to organize due to weak or non-existing trade unions in their field, who see opportunities for better cash flow.
  • Lack of regulations and oversight: bureaucracies that either cannot keep up with technology advances, or political leadership that condones poor working conditions in the name of progress.

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beyond the reach of automation

This week I am reviewing my posts from 2015 and putting some of the core ideas together. Here are some thoughts on how the increasing automation of knowledge work can be addressed by a new approach to organizational leadership.

Any work that is routine will be automated. Jobs that only do routine work will disappear. Valued work, enhanced by our increased connectivity, will be based more on creativity than intelligence. The future of human work will require tacit knowledge and informal learning, and will create intangible value that cannot easily be turned into commodities. The future of work will be complex and this will be even more obvious in the next five years, as robots and software keep doing more complicated work. Just as people had to become literate to work in the 20th century workplace, now they will have to be creative, empathetic, and human: doing what machines cannot do.

More: preparing-for-2020

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automation is coming to a job near you

Just as farmhands were replaced by machines 100 years ago, so too will knowledge workers be replaced by networked computers in the next few decades. Last century, those farmhands had the option of moving to the city and working in factories, but what are the alternatives for today’s knowledge workers? It is not likely to be a new job, as the job itself is being made obsolete, underlined by 54 million freelancers in the USA today, accounting for almost 1/4 of working-age adults. (more…)

writing, communicating, learning

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds.

“Mastery is not referred to the use of any tool. It is a state of the person. And then it permeates the use of *any* tool.”Stelio Verzera

How You Record Ideas May Impact Creativity, via @madelynblair

“As one of our architect users put it in an interview we conducted recently on the value of drawing in the digital age, “When you build a lot of buildings, and you go and visit them, you always think back on that first sketch. Those first few sketches are where the big idea came through.” We found over and over that the act of using sketching as “conversational as opposed to representational,” in the words of another architect, was the key to discovery—when the act of drawing is a means to an end, not the end in and of itself. Through sketching, you locate the idea. Uninhibited sketching is Beethoven’s long walk.”

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