Posts By: Harold Jarche

working smarter

For the past several centuries we have used human labour to do what machines cannot. First the machines caught up with us and surpassed humans with their brute force. Now they are surpassing us with their brute intelligence. There is not much more need for machine-like human work which is routine, standardized, or brute. But… Read more »

managers are for caring

The evidence shows that while telecommuters create positive change, the major resistance against telecommuting comes from management. Our recent report showed that many workers we surveyed viewed managerial and executive resistance to telework as a major obstacle. Through interviews, we learned that executives saw the benefits of using flexible work to their advantage as a… Read more »

new year, same humans

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” —Vox 2020-01-04 “And I came to the sage, and I said, Master, I am lost in these… Read more »

curiosity yields insight

“The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.” —Dorothy Parker The core habit to successfully navigate the network era is curiosity. Curiosity about ideas improves creativity. Curiosity about people improves empathy, by understanding others. We cannot be empathetic for others unless we are first curious about them. We cannot be creative… Read more »

organizations as media

In discussing organizational models and metaphors, Naomi Stanford refers to Gareth Morgan and his influence on organizational design. “Gareth Morgan’s book Images of Organisation (1986),  for example, offered eight organisational metaphors …” — machine, organism, brain, culture, political system, psychic prison, flux & transformation, and instrument of domination. Other researchers have added to this list… Read more »

from enlightenment to entanglement

As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, it is time to question our institutions of governance and commerce that mostly originated during the 18th century Enlightenment. Linearity and Cartesian logic are no longer suitable for a connected and complex world. To change our systems, first we have to understand them, and where… Read more »

best finds of 2019

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. Here are some of the best for 2019. Word of the Year @PhilosophyMttrs — “Word of the Year” — Ultracrepidarian — adjective noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice… Read more »

Graham McTavish Watt

The only person to ever have guest blogged here is Graham Watt, a friend for almost 20 years. I met Graham as I was beginning my freelance career in 2003. With no commute or regular hours I could cycle during the day and drop by the local café for a chat. Graham was semi-retired when… Read more »

turmoil and experimentation

Renee DiResta discusses the challenges brought about by the printing press — invented in Europe in 1450 —  and compares these with the current effects of digital networks in — Mediating Consent. The printing press, invented approximately 50 years before the 95 Theses, extended Luther’s reach from the door of the cathedral to the entirety… Read more »