Posts Categorized: Complexity

get out to the edges

In March [making sense of our digital world] I wrote that my own understanding of the COVID-19 disease started with centres of networked expertise — WHO, CDC, Public Health Agency of Canada. By September [connecting knowledge] I wrote that I see information from the WHO and CDC as lagging indicators, and no longer my first… Read more »

put on your dance shoes

(Let’s dance) for fear your grace should fall (Let’s dance) for fear tonight is all —David Bowie (1983) Let’s Dance Creative work is a constant dance between complexity and order, or curiosity and resolve, as Jony Ive explained in his acceptance speech as the first recipient of the Stephen Hawking Fellowship in 2018. “You see,… Read more »

What is the Zollman effect?

In a series of three posts, Jonathan Weisberg explains the Zollman effect. Here are some highlights. What is the Zollman effect? “More information generally means a better chance at discovering the truth, at least from an individual perspective. But not as a community, Zollman finds, at least not always. Sharing all our information with one… Read more »

cynefin and pkm

I am following up from thoughts on the cynefin framework and how it has informed my own work since 2007. We are almost at the end of our exploratory looking at ways in which personal knowledge mastery and cynefin may be connected, and I hope this will lead to better ways of sensemaking in uncertainty…. Read more »

complexity rules

We live and work in a complex system. Simple, traditional linear models do not work in complex systems. Campbell’s Law is a real thing – people change their behavior to meet targets. These ‘corruption pressures’ often have unintended consequences. Unintended consequences are often negative like the Cobra Effect – things are far worse than when… Read more »

decision-making and trustworthiness

In the book Systems Thinking: Managing chaos and complexity, J. Gharajedaghi provides an example of decision-making by indigenous people of North America. The Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy (Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora)  had given specific roles to its member tribes, namely Wolves (Pathfinders), Turtles (Problem Formulators), and Bears (Problem Solvers). Solving… Read more »

revisiting cooperation

“collaboration means ‘working together’. That’s why you see it in market economies. markets are based on quantity and mass. cooperation means ‘sharing’. That’s why you see it in networks. In networks, the nature of the connection is important; it is not simply about quantity and mass … You and I are in a network –… Read more »

power shifts

“The illiterate of the 21st Century are not those who cannot read and write but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.” ―Alvin Toffler, I read Toffler’s book, Powershift: Knowledge, Wealth, and Power at the Edge of the 21st Century, shortly after it was published in 1990. He saw a shift in power developing due… Read more »

connecting knowledge

In early March I wrote how I was making sense of our digital world at the beginning of this pandemic. Some of my practices have held but after six months, some have changed. For example I see information from the WHO and CDC as lagging indicators, and no longer my first stop to find out… Read more »

an exploratory

On 30 September I will be participating in a series of exploratory sessions with Dave Snowden — learning & sense-making in uncertainty and continuous flux and I have discussed some of the concepts previously in sensemaking in uncertainty. Dave Snowden and Harold Jarche have been exploring different aspects of learning, knowledge management and innovation for decades…. Read more »