Calgary eLearning Network – PKM

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I will be presenting a 90 minute online session to the Calgary eLearning Network on April 18th. The theme will be Personal Knowledge Management (PKM). Barb Krell, an alumna of one of our informal learning unworkshops, is the chief organiser of this session.

I thought it would be best to put my session info online so that participants could link to it, ask any questions in advance or review some of the references.

This post from Lilia Efimova, best sums up PKM:

To a great extend PKM [personal knowledge management] is about shifting responsibility for learning and knowledge sharing from a company to individuals and this is the greatest challenge for both sides. Companies should recognise that their employees are not “human resources”, but investors who bring their expertise into a company. As any investors they want to participate in decision-making and can easily withdraw if their “return on investment” is not compelling. Creativity, learning or desire to help others cannot be controlled, so knowledge workers need to be intrinsically motivated to deliver quality results. In this case “command and control” management methods are not likely to work.

Taking responsibility for own work and learning is a challenge for knowledge workers as well. Taking these responsibilities requires attitude shift and initiative, as well as developing personal KM knowledge and skills. In a sense personal KM is very entrepreneurial, there are more rewards and more risks in taking responsibility for developing own expertise.

Here are my perspectives on PKM from 2005 and later revised in June 2006. My latest reflection on PKM was in Aug 2006, following an unworkshop.

For the April 2007 session, I intend on covering the two main tools – Social Bookmarks, like del.icio.us; and Aggregators, like Bloglines. If there is time, I’ll discuss blogging in general terms. These three tools, in my mind, form the basis of PKM on the Web.

Comments and suggestions are always appreciated.

12 Responses to “Calgary eLearning Network – PKM”

  1. Harold

    I agree, Ben, but I’ll only have time to show one aggregator in detail. I’ll post a list of the main contenders for follow-up after the session. Personally, I’m sticking with Bloglines because I don’t want Google to have ALL of my data.

    Reply
  2. Jon Husband

    Dave Pollard has a lot of material on his blog, including past presentations, on PKM. I think his take on it is seminal.

    I imagine you know that he has written a fair bit about it, but just in case you did not, I thought I’d let you know.

    Reply
  3. Harold

    Thanks, Jon. Dave’s article on the PKM Enabled Organization is one that I constantly refer to:
    http://blogs.salon.com/0002007/2006/09/27.html#a1657

    I like this bit from Dave’s article:

    “So my conclusion this time around was that the centralized content we spent so much time and money maintaining was simply not very useful to most practitioners. The practitioners I talked to about PPI [personal productivity improvement] said they would love to receive PPI coaching, provided it was focused on the content on their own desktops and hard drives, and not the stuff in the central repositories.”

    I think that Google is becoming a more useful PKM tool than all of the KM initiatives of the past 10 years combined. Individuals now have a wide range of very powerful and cheap tools available, but they are blocked by either their IT departments or their own lack of understanding. I am trying to address the latter issue 😉

    Reply
  4. Jon Husband

    I think that Google is becoming a more useful PKM tool than all of the KM initiatives of the past 10 years combined. Individuals now have a wide range of very powerful and cheap tools available, but they are blocked by either their IT departments or their own lack of understanding. I am trying to address the latter issue

    The good news here is that the users (individuals) have a critical mass on their side, or it’s probably shaping up to be that way.

    If they keep on using it (those tools and services) it will become something that grows by virtue of familiarity and demand, aided and abetted by yours and others efforts … no ?

    Reply
  5. Vikram Narayan

    Harold,

    In order to shift responsibility from the organization to the invidividual, we’ve taken a hosted learning content management system and have given authoring rights to all users (www.zendle.com.) Further, the content that is created can be put up for sale in a marketplace (or kept private for consumption by members nominated by the author.) We think this is an innovative approach to allow experts a quick and profitable way to monetize tiny slivers of knowledge that they may have. Do you think this will work?

    Reply
  6. Harold

    No, Vikram, I don’t think this will work. It’s still a content-centric and course-centric model, which I do not believe is suited for the Web.

    Reply

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