friday’s finds #278

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds.

@Richard_Florida “The greatest innovation hoax is that somehow a fancy building will help produce them …”

@JeffWeiner “Well said. Why sci-fi author William Gibson likes Twitter: I’m able to wake up, open Twitter & glance across the psychic state of the planet”

Nobody else owns our experiences by @dsearls

“A hard fact that the advertising industry needs to face is that there is very little appetite for ads on the receiving end. People put up with it on TV and radio, and in print, but for the most part they don’t like it. (The notable exceptions are print ads in fashion magazines and other high-quality publications. And classifieds.) … If companies actually believe in free markets, they need to believe in free customers. Those are people who, at the very least, are in charge of their own experiences in the networked world.”

Brain Pickings: How the Invention of the Alphabet Usurped Female Power in Society and Sparked the Rise of Patriarchy in Human Culture

“There is one fact that can be established: the only phenomenon which, always and in all parts of the world, seems to be linked with the appearance of writing … is the establishment of hierarchical societies, consisting of masters and slaves, and where one part of the population is made to work for the other part.”

“Whenever a culture elevates the written word at the expense of the image, patriarchy dominates. When the importance of the image supersedes the written word, feminine values and egalitarianism flourish.”

Robots Are Taking Divorce Lawyers’ Jobs, Too via @farhanknight

“Couples in the Netherlands can use an online platform to negotiate divorce, custody, and child-support agreements. Similar tools are being rolled out in England and Canada. British Columbia is setting up an online Civil Resolution Tribunal this summer to handle condominium disputes; it will eventually process almost all small-claims cases in the province. Until now, says Suzanne Anton, the province’s minister of justice, ‘if you had a complaint about noise or water coming through your ceiling, you might have to go to the Supreme Court,’ spending years and thousands of dollars to get a ruling.”

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