Fair Copyright for Canada

Have you joined yet?

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From the Facebook group description:

In December 2007, it became apparent that the Canadian government was about to introduce new copyright legislation that would have been a complete sell-out to U.S. government and lobbyist demands. The new Canadian legislation was to have mirrored the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act with strong anti-circumvention legislation that goes far beyond what is needed to comply with the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Internet treaties … Instead, the government was about to choose locks over learning, property over privacy, enforcement over education, (law)suits over security, lobbyists over librarians, and U.S. policy over a “Canadian-made” solution.

 Update: Now is the time to put pressure on your Member of Parliament. Check out Michael Geist’s list of Copyright MP’s.

One Response to “Fair Copyright for Canada”

  1. Gilbert

    Might be more than a sell out.

    Legislative assemblies exist to create laws. US and Canadian Governments are law making machines. This is one of the reasons why so many lawers become ministers. At first this is not a problem but as time goes on we end up having more and more laws. The system that is supposed to protect our freedom becomes a system that makes a criminal out of just about everyone in the country. The current Copyright law is just one example of the law making machine creating more criminals.

    Making everyone a criminal sure opens the door for awful things. For one thing it permits discrimination against groups.

    When just about everone in the country breaks the law those with power can pick and choose who you want to arrest. Tyranny within a democracy.

    Our current legislative system is showing signs of decay. This copyright issue is just a display of inherent deficiencies.

    Our Justice System and Policing Systems are alsow showing signs of decay. You can’t have the law, justice and policing system degrading at the same time and expect to keep the same level of freedom.

    Reply

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