Posts Categorized: Performance Improvement

more than re-skilling

Here is the advice of the co-founder of Degreed on a ‘workplace self-training paradigm‘. First, encourage them to think of reskilling as a game — one they now have more control over winning … Next, help workers manage their skills with regular checkups to evaluate their current expertise against market conditions … Finally, work with… Read more »

the silo effect

“Silos are cultural phenomena, which arise out of the systems we use to classify and organize the world,” states Gillian Tett in The Silo Effect. Silos are bounded hierarchies that define specialized work or areas of knowledge. They come in the form of academic fields, organizational departments, schools of thought, and many other forms created… Read more »

workers are already mature

“Growth is not linear and it doesn’t happen in discrete phases marked by convenient external characteristics” — which is why maturity models are wrong — according to Christiaan Verwijs, specifically looking at agile models. “Of course, maturity models are meant to simplify the complexities of reality. But what is gained by squeezing such a messy,… Read more »

working collaboratively and learning cooperatively

Improving Organizational Performance Organizational performance improvement is comprised of reducing errors and increasing insights, according to Gary Klein. For the past century, management practice has primarily focused on error reduction, with practices such as Six Sigma, especially in manufacturing. “Fifty-eight of the top Fortune 200 companies bought into Six Sigma, attesting to the appeal of… Read more »

just checking the box

Were the two recent crashes of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft a result of inadequate training, or design and safety flaws resulting from a lack of regulator oversight? I don’t know and I cannot speculate. However, I am interested in how training design decisions are made and what role Learning & Development (L&D) professionals play… Read more »

actionable insights

I concluded a few years back that rates based on time at work only help to put you into a pigeon hole so that HR and Purchasing can easily classify you. Knowledge professionals are not pigeons. I have noticed a tendency over the past decade to push wages and fees down. Some may say it’s… Read more »

how professionals learn for work

Jane Hart has been asking her readers what are the most useful/valuable ways that they learn for or at work. In the sixth annual Learning in the Workplace Survey, which surveyed over 5,000 respondents from a wide variety of industries and types & sizes of organizations, the following methods were ranked in order. Daily work… Read more »

working smarter case study

In 2010/2011 Jay Cross and I worked worked with a corporate university of a large US company with the objective to cultivate a fully engaged, high performing workforce through rapid, collaborative, informal, self-directed learning. The aim was for employees to learn fast enough to keep up with the demands of their jobs and grow into… Read more »

connecting work, learning, and life

The 70:20:10 reference model states that, in general, what we learn at work comes 70% from experience, 20% from exposure to new work, and 10% from formal education. At the 70:20:10 Institute [disclosure: I am a service partner], the basic approach is to start with the 70 (experience) because this is where learning and working… Read more »

the missing half of training

The training industry is based on models that were developed for the military. The Systems Approach to Training includes the ADDIE [analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation] model, with variations used throughout industry. Robert Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction inform much of instructional design. Gagne’s early work was in military training. Other models were developed in… Read more »