Posts Categorized: NetworkedLearning

connections trump expertise

A recent research paper — Orthodoxy, illusio, and playing the scientific game — looks at why it took so long for the mainstream medical community to accept that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is predominantly spread as an aerosol and not through surface transmissions. Three fields—political, state (policy and regulatory), and scientific—were particularly relevant to our analysis…. Read more »

subject matter networks

We live in a networked world. Is it even possible for one person to have sufficient expertise to understand a complex situation such as this pandemic? So do we rely on one subject matter expert or rather a subject matter network? I have noted many discrepancies between advice from our Chief Medical Officer of Health… Read more »

a decade of digital transformation

With a focus on improving collaboration, sensemaking, and knowledge sharing in teams, communities and networks, I have had the privilege of working with a wide variety of clients. Ten years ago I tried to convince senior federal public servants of the importance of social media and how they would have to change their relationship with… Read more »

sense before stories

Beware the storytellers and praise the sensemakers In story skepticism (2016) I suggested that while storytelling skills may be important, a critical network era skill will be the ability to deconstruct stories. When it comes to this pandemic, there is no shortage of stories. The emotional, shocking, or fantastic stories get all the attention. The… Read more »

stories for the network age

The TIMN model [Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks] developed by David Ronfeldt has influenced much of my own work in looking at how we are moving toward a network society and must create organizational forms that are beyond national governments and beyond markets. Even combining the efforts of civil society, governments, and markets… Read more »

smarter networks through better narratives

Leadership in a networked world is making our networks and communities smarter so they are able to make better-informed decisions. In early 2020 New Brunswick’s Education Minister, Dominic Cardy, worked very hard to make his network smarter. “When Canada’s chief public health official, Dr. Theresa Tam, was talking about there being no need to “panic,”… Read more »

apprendre dans un monde complexe et chaotique

Traduit par Christian Renard This is a translation of learning in complexity & chaos La plupart de nos structures de travail sont aujourd’hui conçues pour faire face à des situations compliquées, telles que la construction d’un bâtiment, le lancement d’une campagne ou la conception d’un équipement. Mais, aujourd’hui, nous devons faire face à des problèmes… Read more »

the future is here

Work is learning, and learning is the work. This has been my tag line for the past decade. Until recently it felt in some ways that I was talking about the future of work, as many organizations still focused on formal course-based training, and education was firmly established on subject-based curriculum developed in isolation from… Read more »

learning in the flow of work

Networked humans in a connected society: Our increasing inter-connectedness illuminates the need for cooperation. Simple work keeps getting automated, but still needs human oversight. Complicated work gets automated, outsourced, or contracted to the lowest cost of doing business. Complex work can provide a unique business advantage — but complex work is difficult to copy. Creative… Read more »

when trust is lost

When trust is lost, knowledge fails to flow. When knowledge flow is stemmed, trust is lost. There is widespread outcry in China over the death of Doctor Li Wenliang who identified the novel corona virus, was reprimanded by the police for discussing it in public, and then died from the virus. “For many people in… Read more »