Posts By: Harold Jarche

when trust is lost

When trust is lost, knowledge fails to flow. When knowledge flow is stemmed, trust is lost. There is widespread outcry in China over the death of Doctor Li Wenliang who identified the novel corona virus, was reprimanded by the police for discussing it in public, and then died from the virus. “For many people in… Read more »

skepticism and complexity

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “Skepticism: the mark and even the pose of the educated mind.” —John Dewey “A developed country is not a place where the poor have cars. It’s where the rich use public transportation.” —@EnriquePenalosa “We rarely… Read more »

anger, outrage & belonging

A topic of conversation in our monthly coffee club video call this morning was polarization — how different sides increasingly do not listen to each other but instead amplify their own positions. We can each come up with several examples, either from the political, or cultural spheres. Social media have made us all spectators in… Read more »

the cooperative imperative

Collaboration is working together for a common purpose, often directed externally by a boss or client. Cooperation is freely sharing with no expectation of direct reciprocity — quid pro quo. Nicholas Christakis’s ‘social suite’ is a blueprint of a range of traits that are common among all human societies, though not always manifested in the… Read more »

constant doubt and outrage

When I was visiting Rome in 2012 I met a fellow tourist, an older gentleman from Australia, who told me that he had stopped a pick-pocket on the train who was trying to lift his wallet. He had cried out and grabbed the thief’s hand. As the train came to a stop, the locals on… Read more »

keep it simple

It is informative to have your work reflected back by others who have interpreted it in their own ways. This feedback gets integrated into my own continuing development of my sensemaking frameworks. Making these frameworks as simple as possible, but no more, has been my work since 2003 when I decided to become a freelancer… Read more »

no cheap tickets

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “There are no cheap tickets to mastery. You have to work at it, whether that means rigorously analysing a system or rigorously casting off your own paradigms and throwing yourself into the humility of not… Read more »

working smarter

For the past several centuries we have used human labour to do what machines cannot. First the machines caught up with us and surpassed humans with their brute force. Now they are surpassing us with their brute intelligence. There is not much more need for machine-like human work which is routine, standardized, or brute. But… Read more »

managers are for caring

The evidence shows that while telecommuters create positive change, the major resistance against telecommuting comes from management. Our recent report showed that many workers we surveyed viewed managerial and executive resistance to telework as a major obstacle. Through interviews, we learned that executives saw the benefits of using flexible work to their advantage as a… Read more »

new year, same humans

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” —Vox 2020-01-04 “And I came to the sage, and I said, Master, I am lost in these… Read more »