Posts By: Harold Jarche

best finds of 2018

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. Here are the best finds of 2018. Wise Words “Susan Sontag was asked what she had learned from the Holocaust, and she said that 10% of any population is cruel, no matter what, and… Read more »

perpetual beta 2018

The great thing about a blog is that it gives a view of my thinking and how it has progressed or changed over time. This year marked 15 years of freelancing and one new initiative was the perpetual beta coffee club — a community of professionals focused on work & learning in the network era… Read more »

work in 2018

When we look at the future of work, the loss of current jobs, and the effects of automation, we should use a compass to guide us, not a list of what the skills of the future may look like. That compass is self-determination theory which states that there are three universal human drivers — autonomy,… Read more »

democracy and equality

Will technology empower or frustrate learning and will established powers control individuals or will something new emerge? These were the questions asked during the The Edinburgh Scenarios in 2004. The resulting scenarios were as follows. Web of Confidence: Technology advances, power shifts to emergent players. U Choose: Technology frustrates, power shifts to emergent players. Virtually… Read more »

our echo-chambers can kill us

Cultural Echo-chambers Innovation is about making connections — connecting people and connecting ideas. The broader and deeper the connections, the more potential for serendipity. This is why systemic factors like gender or racial bias put organizations and societies at a disadvantage. They lose diversity and they become less innovative. History has shown us this, such… Read more »

saving democracy

Why do younger people generally think it is less essential to live in a democracy? Perhaps it’s because the times are changing. The first democracies (USA, France, and gradually the UK) emerged about 300 years after the invention of the printing press. A free press was a cornerstone of American democracy. All of these are… Read more »

wicked problems

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. @StuartMcMillan: “The only thing you need to feel extremely smart is a lack of curiosity. The perpetually curious will always think they’re dumb.” “Every totalitarian regime is frightened of the artist. It is the… Read more »

staying afloat

How do we make sense in a world of fake news, social media, and fascist thinking, in what is often described as a post-truth society? We have to make sense collectively. No single person can do it alone. The objective of the personal knowledge mastery framework (PKM) is to help professionals become knowledge catalysts. “A… Read more »

“the number one critical skill set”

“Imagine you’re trying to fix a problem, dealing with a crisis, or even just replying to someone, responding to a query, thinking about a possible solution. Most people deal with the issue at hand. That’s great already! But if your KM meta reflex kicks in, all of a sudden you see another arc: Hold on… Read more »

symptoms, causes, & idiots

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. @white_owly — “Symptoms love dressing up as causes. And causes love hiding behind them.” “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our… Read more »