Posts By: Harold Jarche

debunking handbook 2020

The Debunking Handbook 2020 has just been published and is an excellent free guide to address the mass amounts of misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda that flow through our digital communications everyday and then influence real life behaviours. I have discussed some of these phenomena previously, in confronting the post-truth machines and pre-bunking the conspiracy theorists…. Read more »

supporting workplace performance

Many workplace performance issues cannot be solved through training, such as: Poor communications Unclear expectations (such as policies & guidelines) Inadequate resources Unclear performance measures Rewards and consequences are not directly linked to the desired performance The barriers above can be addressed without training. Only when there is a genuine lack of skills and knowledge… Read more »

when training is the wrong solution

Training is too often the proverbial hammer in search of nails. It’s an easy check mark to show that action has been taken, assuming that improving individual skills is the core issue that needs to be addressed. But training does not improve diversity. Firms have long relied on diversity training to reduce bias on the… Read more »

complexity rules

We live and work in a complex system. Simple, traditional linear models do not work in complex systems. Campbell’s Law is a real thing – people change their behavior to meet targets. These ‘corruption pressures’ often have unintended consequences. Unintended consequences are often negative like the Cobra Effect – things are far worse than when… Read more »

hopes and fears

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “Hope and fear cannot occupy the same space. Invite one to stay.” —Maya Angelou @Tom_Peters — “Sunday reminder to leaders. The way you have behaved in the last 6 months and will behave in… Read more »

decision-making and trustworthiness

In the book Systems Thinking: Managing chaos and complexity, J. Gharajedaghi provides an example of decision-making by indigenous people of North America. The Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy (Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora)  had given specific roles to its member tribes, namely Wolves (Pathfinders), Turtles (Problem Formulators), and Bears (Problem Solvers). Solving… Read more »

revisiting cooperation

“collaboration means ‘working together’. That’s why you see it in market economies. markets are based on quantity and mass. cooperation means ‘sharing’. That’s why you see it in networks. In networks, the nature of the connection is important; it is not simply about quantity and mass … You and I are in a network –… Read more »

weird stuff

Fiction sometimes explains reality in a much better way. Corvallis had asked the usual questions about job title and job description. Richard [CEO] had answered simply, “Weird stuff.” When this proved unsatisfactory to the company’s ISO-compliant HR department, Richard had been forced to go downstairs and expand upon it. In a memorable, extemporaneous work of… Read more »

chocolate over broccoli

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. @csessums — “My new favorite definition of Gamification — the process of pouring behaviorist chocolate over instructionist broccoli. Via @bjfr.” @white_owly — “A lecturer told us a story of a woman who had lived… Read more »

power shifts

“The illiterate of the 21st Century are not those who cannot read and write but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.” ―Alvin Toffler, I read Toffler’s book, Powershift: Knowledge, Wealth, and Power at the Edge of the 21st Century, shortly after it was published in 1990. He saw a shift in power developing due… Read more »