Posts By: Harold Jarche

strong ideas, loosely held

Blogging is one way I make sense of the world. I have now written over 3,300 posts on various topics. My ways of seeing the world have changed over the years and blogging has helped to keep my thoughts in a state of perpetual beta — strong ideas, loosely held, in order to deal with… Read more »

art, reality, and truth

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “We have art so that we shall not die of reality.” —Friedrich Nietzsche, via @AnthonyMartinFaria @dsearls — “Future epitaph: ‘I used to be talent. Now I’m just content’.” @MelissaPierce — “This quote from the… Read more »

prebunking the conspiracy theorists

In confronting the post-truth machines I looked at different types of fake news and what could be done to counter them —  Propaganda, Disinformation, Clickbait, and Conspiracy Theories. I mentioned that the researcher danah boyd defines agnotology as — “the strategic and purposeful production of ignorance”. Today, as ever, many forces are at play promoting… Read more »

a trusted space for learning

In 2006 I proposed that we should develop an educational system  of small schools, loosely joined: With access to the Internet a one-room school would have to reach out to the rest of the world and not be wrapped in the confines of the industrial school. Schools would have to seek out partnerships and not… Read more »

jupiter aligns with mars

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. @qcroll — “The century of the speaker is over: Once, we did everything for the speaker’s convenience, gathering in one place. Now, we do everything for the community, because speakers, sponsors, and the audience… Read more »

zoom is not the problem — meetings are

When all you have is Zoom, every work-from-home office looks like an endless face-to-face video call. I have been working remotely since 2003. Video calls have been a regular part of my work and I have used pretty well every platform available. In the early days my favourite platform was Marratech, until they were bought… Read more »

the reality of missing out

When Tim Berners-Lee invented the Worldwide Web he made it free and open source, so others could build upon it. In the early days it was quite open with individuals sharing knowledge through blogging and collectively building knowledge with wikis, the largest being Wikipedia. But as more people joined the web two things happened. Commercial… Read more »

lockdown

Every fortnight — now known as a decade — I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence, it is to act with yesterday’s logic.” —Peter Drucker But in our knowledge economy, says Drucker,… Read more »

beyond civil society, governments, and markets

Binary thinking is an easy sell. It appeals to our emotions which we developed as children. Binary thinking blinds us. It’s not black and white, or right and wrong, or even Left and Right. Human society is many shades along various spectra. But often politicians and others tell us it’s a simple, binary choice —… Read more »

time to change the world

Universities may be going online temporarily, or perhaps permanently, but the curriculum does not seem to have changed. What should be taught at university is how to learn once out of university. In 2013, Jane Hart and I worked with Bangor University in Wales to incorporate personal knowledge mastery into the Psychology curriculum. We started… Read more »